BuiltWithNOF

 

NorviK

Wind Music

 

Tony writes

NorviK Music was formed in 1983 to organise the Wind Chamber week that was then  held every year until 2014 at the White Hart in Harrogate. In 2013 www.largo-music.co.uk took over and in 2015, they moved the event seamlessly to York University, where it still thrives under the direction of Richard Ingham and his partner Margaret Douglass.  In each of those 30 years around 50 wind musicians explored a wide repertoire in every combination from trios to wind symphonies under the tuition of some of Britain's foremost professional musicians; names like Gareth Morris, Ken Smith, Roger Winfield, Michael Winfield, Alan Hacker, Jack McCaw, Stephen Reay. Ian Cuthill, Alan Taylor, Douglas Moore, Bob Ashworth.  NorviK provided the overall management but it was the Leeds Wind Quintet oboe, Jeff Brown, who in the early days made the format work. It soon became a world class event that attracted talented participants from across Europe and the United States.

A feature of the event is a large library and over the years, we have added to it with our own publications, initially focussing on extending the basset horn repertoire but soon concentrating more widely on works that helped with the organisation of mixed groups that never seemed to balance.  Inevitably some drafts went into a pending box never to resurface but almost all the works that now remain in our catalogue have been tried and tested on the event. Some have been worked on and developed with the help of participants. One tutor in particular encouraged the process, conducted their first performance, occasionally played them himself and commented frankly on the result. His help must be acknowledged – the late Alan Hacker. We  also proudly publish two of his editions, the basset clarinet version of the Mozart A Clarinet and a new edition of the Hummel Quartet, also some of his clarinet arrangements.

In the early days we used Capella to produce the scores but at the turn of the century like most small publishers we changed to Sibelius, this enables us to produce  high quality laser prints. Our catalogue now contains just over 50 works but like the supermarkets we keep our costs to a minimum by operating a “just in time” system, a jargon for we don’t keep any stock, just print to order.

Why NorviK - I have been asked if we specialise in Latvian music. The truth is less romantic. At the time that it began my wife and I were heavily involved as bricklayers, plasterers, painters and gardeners in restoring a rather battered old North Yorkshire vicarage, my wife put the nor and vic together; with York’s Jorvik museum in mind I changed the c to k and NorviK was born